Hidden Gems

We decided to do a little driving tour of our a little corner of Margarita this morning, since we'd spent three of the last four days on a beach.  With gas prices at less than four cents a litre, it was well within budget.  We started at the outdoor market where my husband bought the merlot coloured jersey of his beloved football team Venezuela's Vinotino.

Cats and dogs are part of the landscape here.  Most look fairly healthy, I never saw anyone being mean to them and they lie wherever they wish, taking their time moving out of the way when you meet them on a road.  They don't pester you when you're eating but often sit nearby and love a little scratch behind the ears.  A few we saw were not in very good shape at all. Like any other animal it is survival of the fittest but it can be heartbreaking to see.

 Most Venezuelans are Catholic and the Madonna is a very predominant feature.  Every shop has a shrine to her as do most homes.  Some are desplayed in front windows surrounded by twinkling lights


The breakfast my husband has longed for, arepas, are a staple of Venezuelan cuisine.  It's like a heavy doughy pita made with a special corn flour called "pan de harina".  You can stuff it with all sorts o things, but spiced meat or eggs and white cheese are traditional.


Our drive took us to beaches with  brightly coloured fishing boats.  Fishing and tourism are the main employers on Margarita.







Thanks to our tour with Steve and Marsella on Wednesday we remember what was hidden behind this colourful stretch of buildings... a delightful boardwalk with charming restaurants and shops and a white sandy beach.





I always feel bad when the waiter proudly announces all the wonderful fish, oysters, lobsters etc. they have to offer, since neither of us like seafood.  In this case they actually brought out a sample.  I'm sure if you like seafood this looks quite tempting.


We made a plan to spend the day on this beach later in the week.



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